Learning in the 21st Century

According to renowned UK educator John Abbott, the origins of learning in the classroom stems from the Industrial Revolution in Britain when the children of factory workers were taught en mass. Learning was forced by parrot fashion memorization of arithmetical tables, historical facts and figures. Because of the sheer numbers of children to be processed through and then sent to the factories, there was no room for one on one mentorship. Back in the days of the Guilds during the Middle Ages through to the Renaissance, young people learned a craft by being apprenticed to a carpenter, blacksmith, a mason, or to any one of a hundred trades. The nobility and the wealthy sent their children “abroad” to France, Spain, Italy to take the tour of the grand universities, to study under the tutelage of academics . They too received one on one training. John Abbott says traditional classroom learning doesn’t work anymore. It’s time to change the model. Here’s the first of a multi part series I produced for the Canadian Council on Learning called Evolving Education: Learning in the 21st Century  

To view the complete series go to:Learning in the 21st Century

Advertisements

About M. Behrend

As a kid growing up in the sixties I had an overactive imagination. As an adult I realized that sometimes the truth can be more amazing than fiction. Everybody has at least one good story to tell.

5 responses to “Learning in the 21st Century”

  1. Rick Schwier (@schwier) says :

    Nice! I’ve often made the argument that learning is what makes us as a species survive and thrive, and that without it we would soon be the next to become extinct. I like Adams’ thoughts on this, and how we can move education out of the classroom and into the community.

  2. Rick Schwier (@schwier) says :

    Nice! I’ve often made the argument that learning is what makes us as a species survive and thrive, and that without it we would soon be the next to become extinct. I like Abbott’s thoughts on this, and how we can move education out of the classroom and into the community.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: